which tools for millinery flowers - electric with attachments, or the original hand held ones?

really cant decide which to invest in, any feedback would be appreciated

also where can i buy these online, really hard to find!

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I use the Clover mini iron just because I had one that I had used for sewing.  I wanted to purchase some of traditional tools but they were just too pricey - even on eBay.  Here's a page that I thought was interesting.  http://www.lacis.com/catalog/data/AE_FlowerTools.html

Thank you Cynthia, that is fantastic!  Do some of those other tools fit with the clover mini Iron?

I'm not sure.  The only real attachment I have is the little half ball.  This is probably a better site for the Clover mini iron:

http://www.clover-usa.com/products/268136/Mini_Irons

I've talked with crafters who maintain the sterno and brass tools are the only way to go.  I've never tried that, so they may be right.  I've got small kids underfoot much of the time, and I get distracted - so open flames aren't such a good idea for me.  :)

Good luck with it!  

Dear group, I realize I'm a little late in replying to this topic, but I have an electric set of Japanese steel tools from Lacis and a set of brass tools, handmade in Australia, to be used with a metho stove. I'm not really comfortable using the metho stove inside, so the Japanese tools are good for winter months. The brass conducts heat better than the steel tools, but you have to reheat the brass tools often during a process -- plus you can't really regulate heat as well as you can with a soldering iron and a router. On the other hand, the soldering irons that come with a kit are pretty cheap. From the books I used, only a few tools are really needed, although some sets come with many, many tools.  Ebay offers large sets of brass heads and soldering irons that are made in the Ukraine (the soldering iron may be of poor quality). You may want to contact a vendor in the Ukraine and ask for a special set of brass tools with 3 or four heads and match up these heads to a soldering iron available in the country where you live. That way you can save on postage. From my experience, the longer the head, the better off you will be. You don't want the edge of the soldering iron coming into contact with the fabric. If you go to Amazon.com. or Etsy, you can get used books for a fraction of the price of new ones. These books give good insights into which tools you may want. I hope this helps. Best, Suzanne

A flower-making friend tells me the Ukrainian brass heads on Etsy you refer to do work in the Clover mini iron.  I just got one of those.  I know I'll want to try more heads soon, and the Ukrainian vendor offers free shipping, so could be sooner than later.

I recently bought a set from the Ukraine, and I must say the soldering iron is not good as it has no heat regulator on it, so I went to Bunnings and bought a sholdering iron with a switch on the side, is give me th option of high or medium heat, I have not as yet used it on high and i don't think I ever will. Still getting to grips with it all....

I have used traditional flower making tools (round shapes in different shapes). Heat them in a small electric camping cooker-heater (that just cost around 15£ in argos) I found them on line after plenty of research the cheapest place is called Masario. They also have petal shape tools of different flowers.
Also you can find in Ebay but there are not always so probably you need to wait and sometimes as they are "rare" the final price is quite expensive.
Hope this help :)
I have a lovely neighbour who made me some brass hand held ones in 5 various sizes. I love them, use an iron and a sponge and press away...failing that my melon ballet works well too!

Sorry for making link here but I think you will love this tools - https://flowermakingtools.com/shop-2/

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