For those of you who make cut-and-sew hats (i.e. newsboys, flat caps, etc.), what do you use for the brim?

I've previously used two-ply buckram or heavy-weight buckram combined with interfacing. I've gotten decent results, but I'm so picky, I want it to be perfect.

I know that pre-bought brims are also available. Plus there are thermoplastics. I haven't used any of those options for brims yet.

What gives the best result? What looks the most professional, do you think?


Tags: caps, newsboy

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I have something similar by that company (basically the thickest sew-in interfacing I could find at the store), which I've used, and it's okay. Maybe I'll check out their sturdier options.

Hi, at Hats off we used the base of shopping bags. It is plastic but not too thick.

I have been tought to use plastic buckets... that works ok to :D

I use jute ......stiffened which is called by various names....Brown Buckram, Stiffened Linen Jute, or known as GUMMED CLOTH.

I enclBest thing ever - I do not have to double it and it can be shaped with steam on a form to take any shape so I USE IT TO MAKE MY BLOCKS TOO!!! lovely stuff.

Where do you get Stiffened Linen Jute?

Depending on where you are in the world you can get it from:

France =called jute gommee, (0r known as furniture buckram, brown buckram, gummed cloth or stiffened jute) you can buy from ARTNUPTIA FRANCE

UK= PARKIN FABRICS,  WILLIAM GEE,  EBAY ( various sellers like...I want FABRICS,) or Whaleys 

Ask for heavy or medium Natural Hessian, jute tarpaulin, or all the above names ...it's easier if you buy pre-gummed.... If not you can use a spray adhesive .

This material can take on any shape you want by steaming, dampening or wet shaping - plenty suppliers on EBay.... And if all else fails wherever you are in the world look for furniture FABRICS suppliers this material is still used in sofa making and beds!

So eBay is a good bet!

All the best it's fairly cheap starts at around 99pence per metre no more than £3 with other suppliers

Thanks!

some use leather or card stock, the card stock can fall apart over time, the leather requires a sewing machine that can stitch thru it. I have also seen people use plastic from soda pop bottles or the cardboard from the back of a pad of paper. I use buckram and heavy interfacing. I am not worried about period correctness only comport and durability, due to a craniotomy.

Have you tried Judith M?  She has several different size and shaped cap brims available.

I've tried  a lot of different things for hat visors/brims. The pre-cut plastic brims are great, but are limiting in shape and size. What I have found that work great and allows me to design my own shapes is bonded leather board. It can be hard to locate, and the only place I've found so far that sales it in small quantities is: Prescot & Mackay. They specialize in shoe and bag making but some of their products are also great for millinery. 

http://www.prescottandmackay.co.uk/#!bag-making-products/c1y81

If all else fails depending on where you are in the world and cannot get stiffened jute/ Hessian medium or heavy weight!  There is this new leather paper which shapes and steams well and you can buy from Amazon, double it if you want too but the material makes sturdy handbags, easy to cut cap peaks etc. Here are the details ....KRAFT-TEX natural roll paper fabric.  The price is not bad you get enough peaks for your money!

As a maker I vote for gummed jute heavy or medium first....this only as the next best alternative as it will not affect your product pricing   as any other items on market and for those with arthritis it is not too much strain on hands to cut ( I refer to both). 

kraft-tex®: Roll, Natural Hardcover – June 1, 2013

I have used templastic, usually available through quilting shops and suppliers as they use it for templates for applique shapes and such,   hope that helps Shauna 

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